All Our Mothers



Geishe in his free book, Modern Buddhism: The Path of Compassion and Wisdom - Volume 1 Sutra suggests that we recognize every other human being we meet as having once been our mother in a former life. We are reminded that mothers are women who have given birth, sacrificing themselves, giving up sleep at night to tend to their babies, giving up food so their children can eat, risking their very lives for the safety and wellbeing of their children.

I find this reflection a means of loving others of all stripes, persuasions, and creeds. My mum (seen in photo) was my best friend, and I remember during those years in England after WWII when rationing was still in effect how she went without, giving us kids the last of the sausages for dinner.

Contemplation from Geishe: “We should contemplate as follows: Since it is impossible to find a beginning to my mental continuum, it follows that I have taken countless rebirths in the past, and, if I have had countless rebirths, I must have had countless mothers. Where are all these mothers now? They are all the living beings alive today. Having become convinced that all living beings are our mothers, we contemplate the immense kindness we have received from each of them when they were our mother, as well as the kindness they have shown us at other times.

For Christians this is akin to seeing Christ in all others. Certainly, it is a good practice to recognize other people, some who we may consider less than us, some who may have hurt us, some who struggle with addictions and who knows what, and see they are equal to us in potential and lovability. And we remember we all need help from one another all the time.

None of us, no matter our circumstances, are, in the eyes of Theos (God) which in Greek means to see, is more or less than others. We are all potential Bodhichitas which Christians might consider becoming one-with-Christ.



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